Time to Rethink Education: How Real World Learning Can Better Prepare Students for the Future of Work

Summary of Study

Bottom Line: The education system has remained stagnant over the last century while the economy has changed rapidly. While there are countless post-secondary educational options, reflecting the needs of today's economy, high schools have yet to adapt. The Kauffman Foundation's Rethink Ed conference brought thought leaders together to reimagine the high school diploma for today's economy. 

Today's high school education system doesn't prepare students for the demands of today's economy. Too many students are unable to make the jump from classroom to career. Due to this underteaching of real-world skills, parents believe students are underprepared for the workforce. 

Parents believe that the model for how both school and student performances are assessed is outdated. 60 percent of parents do not trust standardized testing as an effective way to measure high school accountability. 

Parents of color emphasize rigor, self-control, and four year-college as the keys to success, while white parents emphasize soft skills, independence, and flexibility about four-year college.

In an increasingly globalized gig economy, more viable postsecondary options exist now than ever before, including industry recognized credentials, high skilled training, associate and vocational degrees, and work experience credits. High schools must embrace this changing workplace and offer and encourage students to choose educational experiences that provide employer-recognized skill-sets, which foster a more seamless transition from school to the workplace.

Read the full report here

Feature Charticle

Parents Who Believe Past vs. Present High School Graduates Are Less Prepared for Today's Economy

Kauffman Foundation

Findings:

  • Most parents today feel that high schools do not prepare students for the economy vs. just 30 percent who felt this way in the past. 

  • 60 percent of parents do not trust standardized testing as an effective way to measure high school accountability. 

  • High schools must embrace this changing workplace and offer and encourage students to choose educational experiences that provide employer-recognized skill-sets, which foster a more seamless transition from school to the workplace.

Read the full study here